Tag Archives: American Golden-Plover

Fall Shorebirds

American Golden-Plover

American Golden-Plover (click to see the larger version)

Shorebird migration may be past peak but that doesn’t mean shorebird migration is over. Six species were at Montrose Beach on September 22, including

American Golden-Plover – 1 juvenile
Black-bellied Plover – 7 juveniles
Killdeer – 2
Pectoral Sandpiper – 3 juveniles
Least Sandpiper – 4
Lesser Yellowlegs – 2

A number of other shorebirds occur at this time of the year, including Dunlin (expected) and Long-billed Dowitcher (rare), and later in the fall Purple Sandpiper and Red Phalarope are possible. Link to my eBird checklist for the morning below.

eBird Checklist
September 22, 2020

American Golden-Plovers (and others), September 3, 2020

American Golden-Plover

American Golden-Plover (click to see the larger version)

We had a nice variety of shorebirds at Montrose Beach on September 3, highlighted by a pair of adult American Golden-Plovers, an adult Baird’s Sandpiper, 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, and an American Avocet. The fluddle briefly reformed on the public beach after overnight rains, providing valuable habitat. These birds were probably moving ahead of a cold front expected to pass later in the day. Checking the beach throughout the day could pay off. More photos are at my eBird checklist for the morning, URL below.

eBird Checklist
September 3, 2020

American Golden-Plovers, August 31, 2017

American Golden-Plovers

American Golden-Plovers (click to see the larger version)

I made a late afternoon run to Montrose today, August 31, to see if anything fun and interesting was on the beach. I didn’t have anything as exciting as the recent Parasitic Jaeger or Buff-breasted Sandpiper, but I did find 3 adult American Golden-Plovers on the public portion of the beach. The birds were initially near the plastic boardwalk but flushed and relanded a short distance away. A fair number of people were using the beach this afternoon, so I had a feeling the birds would be jumpy. Sure enough, when an unleashed dog got too close they picked up and flew off to the north. Typical. And frustrating. I also had a juvenile Baird’s Sandpiper, Semipalmated Plovers and Sandpipers, and Sanderlings. The good news is that Lake Montrose has reformed and should be attractive to migrant shorebirds as long as it lasts (Lake Montrose is the fluddle that forms on the public beach after a heavy rain). This is prime time for Red Knots and Whimbrels along Lake Michigan.

American Golden-Plover, September 20, 2016

American Golden-Plover

American Golden-Plover (click to see the larger version)

I went over to Montrose late this afternoon, September 20, to look for the juvenile American Golden-Plover reported earlier in the day. I found the bird at the west end of the beach, standing and walking among beachgoers. It seemed content, despite all the people using the beach. American Golden-Plovers are uncommon but regular fall visitors to Montrose.

Nelson’s Sparrows, September 17, 2016

Black-bellied Plover

Black-bellied Plover (click to see the larger version)

Montrose was pretty good this morning, September 17. I ended up with 58 species in about 4 hours of birding the Point. Swainson’s Thrushes and Palm Warblers were the most obvious, but the 8 – 10 Nelson’s Sparrows were the highlight for me. All these birds were in the Dunes and most were in the western panne. These are the first Nelson’s Sparrows I’ve seen at Montrose this fall. When it rains it pours I guess. Other goodies include a flyover American Golden-Plover, Merlin, several Bobolinks, Dickcissel, Marsh Wren, and a variety of warblers.

eBird Checklist
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31620618

October 4, 2014

There were decent numbers of birds at Montrose this morning, especially Palm and Yellow-rumped Warblers and both kinglets. I also had Magnolia, Tennessee, Black-and-white, and Black-throated Green Warblers, American Redstart, and Bobolink among others. I saw a Nelson’s Sparrow in the meadow east of the Magic Hedge, my first Nelson’s of the fall. The American Golden-Plover was still at the beach along with 5 Black-bellied Plovers.